Definition: Snowboarding Trailer II


Matt Devino released his second trailer for his upcoming feature length documentary film Definition: Snowboarding. Check out this trailer and you will see some familiar faces from the Flow Snowboarding family.

“Matt Devino is reaching out and making a difference,” said Dale Rehberg of Flow Snowboards. “Gotta love the passion… it’s all about expression!”

DEFINITION: SNOWBOARDING. This is a documentary film project exploring the definition of snowboarding from the perspective of those who live it. They would like to invite the entire industry to be a part of this exploration, and to help show the world just how amazing snowboarding truly is.

“I’m really excited to have the backing of Flow for the project,” said Matt Devino “They have an amazing team and everyone at the company loves snowboarding, which is what this film is really all about. The film is sure to be even better with their support.”

Definition: Snowboarding is two year project to be released in the Fall of 2015. It will include dozens of interviews and document all aspects of riding and the lifestyle that encompasses it. Interviews will be shot over the course of 2014, and exclusive riding footage will be shot during the winter of 2014/2015. Here’s a link to the trailer. So stoked for this film.

For more information on the film Definition: Snowboarding please visit:
www.definitionsnowboarding.com
www.facebook.com/definitionsnowboarding

For more information on filmmaker Matt Devino please visit:
www.mattdevino.com
www.twitter.com/matt_devo
www.facebook.com/mattdevino1

Flow Snowboarding is excited about how this film is coming together. It speaks the common thread within snowboarding that ties us all together. Let us know what you think of the film trailer on Social media.

Flow Snowboarding
www.facebook.com/flow
www.twitter.com/flowsnowboardn
www.instagram.com/flowsnowboardn

Come join us at Flow Snowboarding
www.flow.com

Dru Williams: Midwest Grom to Flow Ambassador

“Everyone is in the industry for a reason…because they made it there. If you plan on stepping into the industry, know your side and be nice to everyone. Ride hard and don’t talk about it. Do what people tell you to do and earn their respect; it will all pay off one day. My first few years made me feel like an intern, not a team rider. The most important thing to remember is to have fun! C’mon… it’s snowboarding.” – Dru Williams, Flow Ambassador

We had the opportunity to catch up with Flow Snowboarding Ambassador Dru Williams in Utah, who offers some valuable insight covering the last several years working with Flow and his time in the snow sports industry. We will cover his growth from grom the Flow Snowboarding Ambassador, his productions company 43 Productions LLC, his band Halfway Humble, and even his humbling trip to Thailand.

What would you consider your home mountain to be?

“I grew up snowboarding in Indiana at a local hill called ‘Paoli Peaks.’ It was a great place for me to start this long lasting lifestyle. My friend Kalyn Gibson and I ran the terrain park, which allowed us to build and promote the terrain park and resort as we pleased. It was a great place to learn because it was essentially a big hard sheet of ice. It is essentially 300 vertical feet of bliss and has been providing the Midwest with action packed memories and concussions three months a year for over 40 years. The place reeks of Coors and the Carhart camouflage wearing enthusiast. I am damn proud to call it my home mountain.” (Check out Dru Williams’ Paoli Peaks edit)

Where was the first place you went snowboarding?

“Like most people… my backyard. My brother Alex and I would get old skateboard decks and strap them to our feet while being pulled behind a 4-wheeler. It was a Midwest rednecks dream come true, but obviously didn’t work well. Mind you, we were skidding in two inches of fresh Indiana powder. We earned those damn turns. We smelled like exhaust and gasoline after.”

Did you ever ski first, or straight to riding?

“Haha! At age 12 I clicked in for a few weeks. My Mom bought me a brand new pair of skis, bindings and boots for Christmas. This was essentially my first piece of hard good snow gear I had ever owned. She was beyond pumped to get them for me and I was excited to receive them. However, once I got to the peaks I knew it wasn’t for me. A few weeks later I told her I wanted to trade them at the Paoli Pro Shop for a snowboard. She was livid. Not that she cared that I was snowboarding… but she had just spent seven-hundred bones on a new ski set up for me, just turn around and trade them in for half the price.

But, I cannot thank my Mom enough for traveling with us and taking us to so many resorts and competitions in the early years. That was truly what helped shape and mold our young futures. Every season my mother would load up the Chrysler mini van and take my friends and I to every competition in the surrounding area. She traveled between states throughout the Midwest with a load of smelly kids in the back. Our young crew had a good record of dominating the competitions we rode in, so the rides back were always nice and loud (with a stronger stench of victory.)”

What are some of your favorite Apres Ski activities?

“Putting your feet up and relaxing is the best thing to do after a long day, but that depends on how heavy of a day it was. If it was a day of shooting or being shot, I will spend the evening sorting and logging footage. If it was a weekend day at Brighton you can normally find the crew and I at Lone Star Taqueria or Spedelli’s after a long day of riding. Best tacos & pizza in the valley!”

What is your current Flow setup? (Boots, Board(s), Bindings) How do you set your stance?

“The technology that Flow puts into their product is unreal and it’s best to utilize that tech on specific days and conditions. For park, I prefer something softer. Currently my set up is 2014/2015 155 Era snowboard, size 11 Hylite boots and Fuse SE bindings. On those deep days, I prefer a stiffer set up like my 157 Darwin snowboard, size 11 Solite boots (some might know what these are yet) and NX2-SE bindings.

You have been involved with Flow since you were 17. Can you recap how you started working with Flow and the different responsibilities you’ve held over the years?

“One night after a long night session of park riding, I was walking out to my car (just got my drivers permit) and I stumbled upon the Flow van. Adam Sharp, the Midwest Flow rep at the time was always at the peaks checking on one of his accounts and getting his shaved ice turns in. I had met Adam before and talked to him about Flow and snowboarding. When I walked past the van he stopped me and we chatted for a bit. After our conversation he pulled out a brand new Era snowboard and handed it to me with his card. It was a grom’s dream come true and I was beyond stoked to receive the gear, but I didn’t really know what it meant at the time.

The following winter we linked up in the early season and it all began from there. Countless hours traveling in the Flow van throughout the Midwest hitting shops, on snow demos, competing in contests and in summer rail jams. The first winter I hopped on-board with Flow was the last year that SnowSports Industries America (SIA) was held in Vegas. Imagine little me at 17 years old, hopping on a flight to Vegas all by myself, not knowing what to expect.

The years continued and I became much tighter within the Flow community (this included team members and upper management within the company.) I’ve traveled to countless demos and contests with sales managers and even board designers. I soon started to realize how important it was to meet these people and make them a constant contact. I am now 25 years old and nothing has changed. I have attended SIA with the crew the last seven years (now in Denver) helping show the upcoming product lines, attending meetings, shooting video and being a strong ambassador of Flow like the rest of the team.”

Could you describe what your current responsibilities with Flow are?

“Currently, I am a Flow R&D team rider. The ride and development team is responsible for riding and testing future products. Essentially, I shred as much as I can and log my day on a spreadsheet or make my review into a video. What I like… what I don’t like… How this binding feels with this strap, compared to this other strap… You know, that kind of thing. I also occasionally help Flow with their video needs.”

Any advice to those out there looking to get involved in the snow sports industry?

“Remember names and don’t step on toes. Everyone is in the industry for a reason…because they made it there. If you plan on stepping into the industry, know your side and be nice to everyone. Ride hard and don’t talk about it. Do what people tell you to do and earn their respect; it will all pay off one day. My first few years made me feel like an intern, not a team rider. The most important thing to remember is to have fun! C’mon… it’s snowboarding.”

You recently moved to Salt Lake City. How’s the move going?

“I am 15 minutes away from six of the US’s best resorts, what more could you ask for? It was crazy moving from a small town in Indiana to a larger city with actual mountains. I have gained much more respect for all of the different styles of snowboarding. It opened up a whole new world in the snow community for me as well. Instead of sneaking into a sorority party at Indiana University for example, you are now welcomed to an Electric Goggle Halloween party instead. It’s exactly where I dreamed I would live as a kid, and I couldn’t be happier with the results.”

Tell us a little bit about 43 Productions.

43 Productions is my production company that was established back in 2006, but became an actual LLC in 2012. I knew if I packed my car up and was moving out West, I better have a back up plan. My main focus with the company was to shoot snowboarding, but we have branched out immensely upon request. 43 Productions was contracted with Powder Mountain resort last season to shoot all of the awesome contests and events they hold every season, which was a great opportunity for us.

We have also dipped our feet into real estate and architecture firms requesting video needs for continuous projects throughout the valley. We couldn’t be more pleased with results. I have vast business plans for 43 Productions, LLC that are currently in the works and things are starting to shape up nicely. Next winter will be huge for us.”

What kind of activities do you do in the summer to maintain your riding shape?

“The house I just moved into is right down the road from In-N-Out, so I am currently on that diet and it’s working out great. Besides that, I picked up mountain biking last summer, which is way too much fun out here. I ended up investing in a bike and couldn’t be more pleased with how fun it is. I also have a dirt bike that I enjoy taking out into the desert and getting lost with. Snogression in Salt Lake is also a great way to keep your riding sharp, but it takes a small mortgage and a few classes to get through that.

I try to keep a normal gym routine throughout the summer, but that schedule normally lacks in persistence. Recently, our band Halfway Humble has been practicing non-stop for a few upcoming shows we have. I have noticed that the best work out for me is just drumming for 3 hours straight, it keeps your arms tone and you get to bang on shit. Why wouldn’t anyone want to work out this way?”

What was your favorite moment from last winter?

“My first road trip of the season to Colorado was great. I left late on a Thursday night and stopped at a few shops on the way for Flow. These stops consisted of dropping sample product off and chatting (or just saying hey) and making sure the shop has everything they need. I arrived in Aspen late Thursday night and stayed the entire weekend for X-games. Our cabin was unreal and the experience I had with the crew is something I will remember for forever.

On that Sunday, I packed my car up and headed to Denver for a full week of SIA, where I was reacquainted with the Flow crew & team. It was a full week of cranking business, partying hard and good music. We then loaded up the Flow van and headed to Copper Mountain for the on-snow demo and a few good days of solid riding. The weather was perfect and the vibes were high, it was the perfect way to end a two-week trip with the Flow team & crew.

Once I arrived back in Salt Lake, the ground was covered with over 3 feet of snow. Which meant my backyard park that my friends and I built was ready to be tested. Some of my other favorite moments from last season come directly from my backyard. Check it out here on my Vimeo channel… Outback The Movie.”

What are some of your passions in life other than snowboarding? Activities, hobbies, studies… etc?

“I have a strong passion for music that will never go away. I’ve played the drums longer than I have done anything else, and I seem to still learn something new after every practice. Music is something that is always changing, making it hard to keep up with. When a band tries to “keep up,” a new sound will normally develop and the crowd will become pleased…and then you repeat.

I wouldn’t say that studying is a passion of mine, but I did plenty of it in College. I will say that studying subjects that are obsolete to your major will cause major headaches and unwanted stress. If you are an art student, go to an art institute. If you are a filmmaker, go to ‘Full Sail’ University. The big Universities with multiple schools and majors are for the kids who are unsure of what they want to do; I found this out the hard way. I also really enjoy woodworking. My buddy Corbett and I built the entire backyard park out of scrap and recycled wood. These are things you don’t appreciate until you get older I suppose.”

Any places you love travelling to, not related to snowboarding?

“I went to Thailand over a year ago and fell in love with the culture. It also made me realize how lucky most of us are. I saw some things that made me both sick and happy. One memory that sticks out the most was at the black market in Bangkok, where knock off Vans are about four US dollars and you can leave the place with any cheap female you pick if you desire. I remember seeing a small family sitting on the corner begging for change. The kids were basically naked and you could tell that help was needed.

I walked over and gave them three or four custom printed band t-shirts that I had just bought for myself. I also gave the kids Flow stickers and they were ecstatic. (Yes, I was tagging Bangkok left and right with Flow stickers). The mother of the family was so happy she started crying. She then grabbed my wrist and whispered something in Thai into my ear. To this day I still think about that family. I’m also still wondering what the hell she whispered to me. Self-Kudos was earned on that trip.”

Anything else you’d love to say to the Flow Snowboarding supporters and family?

Please don’t break up with me… Seriously though, I can’t thank the Flow family enough. Flow has provided me with opportunities and experiences that I only dreamed of as a kid. It’s cool to look back on the last seven years of my life and see how involved Flow was and still is. This brand has pushed me in such a positive direction and has helped drive me into entrepreneurship. Don’t get me wrong, snowboarding would still be insanely fun without Flow, but I can’t thank you all enough for the support and love and I hope that feeling is mutual. Thank you again, cheers to many more.”

Dru Williams has been riding Flow Snowboarding gear ever since he was a grom. When did you start riding Flow gear? We would love to hear about it. Please connect with us at Flow Snowboarding via Social Media and hashtag #FlowSnowboarding.

Dru Williams
www.facebook.com/druwilliams43
www.instagram.com/drut43

Flow Snowboarding
www.facebook.com/flow
www.twitter.com/flowsnowboardn
www.instagram.com/flowsnowboardn

Come join us at Flow Snowboarding
www.flow.com

Flow Rush Snowboard & NX2 Bindings – Gadgets & Gear (SIA 2014)

In the video above, Greg Elliot from Vail’s TV8 show Gadgets & Gear spoke with Flow Snowboarding’s Dale Rehberg about the NX2 bindings and Rush snowboard. This was shot at the 2014 SnowSports Industries America (SIA) tradeshow in Denver, CO.

Have you tried out the yet NX2 bindings or the Rush snowboard? We would love to hear your feedback on both the NX2′s and the Rush. Reach out to us at Flow Snowboarding via Social Media and hashtag #FlowSnowboarding.

Getting to Know Your Flow Fusion PowerStrap

The Fusion PowerStrap foot-strap is 3D-shaped so it can fuse the ankle & toe zones over the mid-foot and is padded for a super comfortable form fit. In this quick video we show you how to properly set up your Fusion foot-straps with your Flow Bindings. Make sure you set your bindings up before you go riding, put your boots on, strap in and jump around on the carpet to make sure it feels good!

The FusionStrap is featured on Flow NX2, Fuse, ISIS, Five and Minx bindings.

Have you tried Flow’s FusionStrap yet? Let us know what you think about the FusionStrap technology at Flow Snowboarding via Social Media and hashtag #FlowSnowboarding to let us know.

The Flow of the American Ninja Warrior

Tonight on NBC’s American Ninja Warrior, Former Flow Team Rider Tim Dauenhauer will hit the unique obstacle course and compete to be the next American contestant after Kacy Catanzaro to complete the course. Come cheer on a fellow knuckle dragger and part of our Flow Snowboarding family tonight at 8PM-10PM ET/PT. We all agree that to be a professional snowboarder, it takes a lot of core strength, mental toughness and an overall mastery of physical conditioning in order to reach ones optimal limits. Take the drive it takes to be a professional athlete and mix with one of Tokyo Broadcasting System Television’s 30 year old programs “Sasuke” and you have why we are watching NBC’s American Ninja Warrior this evening. We took a moment to sit down with Dauenhauer about his experience on the hit television show.

Since you’ve been a rider with Flow, what have you been up to (other than American Ninja Warrior, of course)?

I can’t snowboard everyday anymore (a shared moment of silence). Even though I refuse to grow up, I somehow acquired a grown up job where I get to play with explosive natural gas. I repair, maintain and install underground natural gas pipelines and facilities. If I can’t drop cliffs and ride backcountry then I need to get my danger fix somewhere. Haha…

They know you on American Ninja Warrior as the big mountain snowboarding ninja. Awesome. What mountains do you typically ride in the winter?

Haha yeah… When I’m home in Syracuse I ride a few of the local areas with the occasional trips to Vermont. But, I most look forward to riding the Arlberg in Austria. In years past I’ve spent a lot of time riding the North Island in New Zealand. It’s just difficult now-a-days to pull me away from these beautiful upstate New York summers.

What is your current snowboard setup?

My current setup Is Talon boots, Maverick 169, and NX2-RS bindings. I’m old school, you know? I like stiff, ultra-supportive equipment, complimented by a big fast board.

You made it onto American Ninja Warrior through the St Louis city finals. Is that where you are living now or where is home base for Tim Dauenhauer?

My home is in Syracuse NY although I often find myself drifting back and forth to the Arlberg area in Austria. Ninja Warrior has five regional city competitions where America is broken up geographically. About 125 competitors per region, the top 30 advance to city finals and then the top 15 advance to national championship. I competed in the North East regionals which took place in St. Louis this season.

How did you get involved with Ninja Warrior?

American Ninja Warrior is modeled after the original Ninja Warrior competition from Japan known as “Sasuke.” Many years ago, I always wanted a chance to compete on Sasuke. However, it being an exclusive Japanese event, the closest I ever came was in my living room watching it on some random TV channel at  2AM. I lost touch with show for almost 15 years and re-discovered that their was now an American version. I missed the audition deadline three years ago, then two years ago I rushed my video audition. It wasn’t very creative, so I didn’t make the cut that year. Your video audition is extremely important in determining your odds of being chosen to compete. This previous winter I got my act together and with the help of a good friend we made a great video that showcased my personality as well as my talents.

What kind of training did you do before hand to prep yourself for competing on Ninja Warrior?

Training is intense year round, but the most critical time for me is 3 months leading up to the event. I focus a lot on balancing, along with grip and finger strength exercises. I have a few important training obstacles at my home such as a salmon ladder and a few other goodies. Technique is so important. Raw strength can only take you so far.

What was it like to film the show? Any experiences you’d like to share?

Taking part in American Ninja Warrior was a great experience! The producers, casting and crew are all cool people that love what they do. An interesting aspect of the show is just the positive vibes flowing everywhere. It’s a very unique sort of competition where all the athletes genuinely want to see their opponents do well and succeed on the course. One thing that maybe not many people know is that since filming takes place at night competitors are running the course until 6:00 in the morning.

You plan on taking a trip to Austria soon. What kind of training do you plan on doing out there?

As far as training goes, I’m putting a lot of emphasis on climbing and single arm hanging. I also have an incredibly difficult stunt planned.

Anything else you’d like to say to the Flow Snowboarding supporters or your American Ninja Warrior fans?

The Flow Snowboarding community has been a big part of my life for a long time and I want to say thanks to everyone for helping me over the years climb mountains and summit new opportunities. Snowboarding has influenced my life in so many ways and American Ninja Warrior wouldn’t have been possible without all the support of my friends and family everywhere.

Are you going to be cheering on Flow Snowboarding family Tim Dauenhauer tonight and watch American Ninja Warrior on NBC? Do you think being a snowboarder gives you an advantage in finishing an obstacle course? Let us know at Flow Snowboarding via Social Media and hashtag #FlowSnowboarding to let us know what you think.

Flow Micron Freddy Silber Earning His Turns


Last week, one of our Microns was earning his turns under the summer sun. On June 28th, Flow Micron Team Athlete Freddy Silber and his father Jay Sibler went on a quest for snow by taking a 16 mile round trip bike and hike voyage to ride Byers Peak in Colorado. To get to the snow they had to climb above the treeline to roughly 12,000 feet.

“My favorite memory was seeing all the amazing scenic views from hiking up and down the trail,” said Freddy Sibler.

Freddy and Jay Silber left their house at 5:00AM and hit the trail at 6:00 AM near his home resort in Winter Park, Colorado and into the Byers Peak Wilderness Area in Winter Park, Colorado. Once they were on the snow, Freddy strapped onto his snowboard, a 140 Shifty. His Fuse bindings set at 15° & 15° and he certainly made sure the boas were tight enough on his Rivals. While most of us in the Northern Hemisphere were dreaming of snow, the Silbers hiking and riding it.

“We hiked it most of the morning until the snow heated up and got too sticky,” explained Jay Silber. “There was a ton of snow and there is still a ton of snow on the peaks here in Colorado. A lot of snowboard opportunities to be had this summer if you put in some effort to get there.”

This week, Flow Snowboarding had a chance to dive into the head of Freddy Silber and ask him a few questions about his summer, last winter and what he is looking forward to this coming winter.

What kind of music do you listen to when you ride?
I listen to some electronic music. I mainly listen to hard rock and metal. 

Where was your favorite place to travel to, not related to snowboarding?
My favorite place to travel to is Kansas City, Missouri. I love to hang out with my family.

What was your favorite memory from last winter?
My favorite memory from last winter was a Steamboat USASA competition for slopestyle. It was such a great time with my snowboard team and good times and food. I took 2nd at that comp so it was really rewarding. Very exciting!

Where are you looking forward to riding next year?
I’m looking forward to riding at Breckenridge and Keystone with the Flow Team and for contests. They have amazing rails and jumps.

Any interest in the FIFA World Cup soccer matches this summer?
I don’t like soccer at all! It’s not for me. Not trying to be rude, but I don’t care about it! I’m more into baseball.

Anything else you’d like to say to the Flow Snowboarding supporters?
I would like to say thanks to everyone because they are such an amazing part in this brand. I also have a snowboard crew, which is myself and six of my best friends called Snow Provides. We are a film crew and media page. We post up on Instagram and YouTube all winter.

Are any of you going the extra miles to hike to where the snow still sits in the Northern Hemisphere? Please share with us where you are continuing your snowboarding this summer by connecting with us at Flow Snowboarding via Social Media.

Freddy Silber
www.facebook.com/freddysilber
www.twitter.com/__f_r_3_d_d_y__
www.instagram.com/freddy_silber

Snow Provides
www.instagram.com/snowprovides
www.youtube.com Snow Provides 

Flow Snowboarding
www.facebook.com/flow
www.twitter.com/flowsnowboardn
www.instagram.com/flowsnowboardn

Come join us at Flow Snowboarding
www.flow.com

Definition: Snowboarding – A Feature Film From Matt Devino

Flow Snowboarding, Snowboarding, Tim Humphreys, Definition: Snowboarding, Matt Devino, Snowboarding Film

Remember when half pipes looked like this? Flow Snowboarding Team Athlete Tim Humphreys hand planting in an old school half pipe

Are you excited for Definition: Snowboarding, the upcoming feature length documentary film from filmmaker Matt Devino?

We here at FlowSnowboarding are backing this flick. You’ll see a few of our friends from Flow like Scotty Lago and Tim Humphreys.

DEFINITION: SNOWBOARDING. This is a documentary film project exploring the definition of snowboarding from the perspective of those who live it. They would like to invite the entire industry to be a part of this exploration, and to help show the world just how amazing snowboarding truly is.

“I’m really excited to have the backing of Flow for the project,” said Matt Devino “They have an amazing team and everyone at the company loves snowboarding, which is what this film is really all about. The film is sure to be even better with their support.”

“Matt Devino is reaching out and making a difference,” said Dale Rehberg of Flow Snowboards. “Gotta love the passion… it’s all about expression!”

Definition: Snowboarding is two year project to be released in the Fall of 2015. It will include dozens of interviews and document all aspects of riding and the lifestyle that encompasses it. Interviews will be shot over the course of 2014, and exclusive riding footage will be shot during the winter of 2014/2015. Here’s the teaser trailer below. So looking forward to this film.

For more information on the film Definition: Snowboarding please visit:
www.definitionsnowboarding.com
www.facebook.com/definitionsnowboarding

For more information on filmmaker Matt Devino please visit:
www.mattdevino.com
www.twitter.com/matt_devo
www.facebook.com/mattdevino1

Flow Snowboarding is stoked for this film. It speaks the common thread within snowboarding that ties us all together. Let us know what you think of the film trailer on Social media.

Flow Snowboarding
www.facebook.com/flow
www.twitter.com/flowsnowboardn
www.instagram.com/flowsnowboardn

Come join us at Flow Snowboarding
www.flow.com

R.I.P. TOM SIMS…

Thank you Tom Sims!

On Wednesday September 12th, 2012 Tom Sims passed away due to cardiac arrest

THE STORY BELOW WAS TAKEN FROM FACEBOOK PAGE “HISTORY OF SNOWBOARDING” AND WRITEN BY HIS GOOD FRIEND.  THIS STORY IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT, FROM TOM’S HISTORY TO SNOWBOARDING LIFESTYLE IN GENERAL.  READ IT, SOAK IT… LIVE IT

Tom Sims, in memorial:Through the mid 80’s, early 90’s, there were many things Tom Sims and I planned to do together. We had a list:

1. Build the first permanent half-pipe ever at a Ski Area, in Snow Summit, California.

2. Teach every skater in Japan to snowboard.

3. Get the Sims Skate brand away from Vision Streetwear, sign Hosoi.

4. Start a mountain bike company.

5. Make a snowboard photo album for that thing called the Internet.

6. Decide if we were Canon or Nikon guys. Fuji or Kodak film (he would do some testing and later tell me which way to go).

7. Open every ski area in the world to snowboarding.

8. Beat the Vermont guy who married the rich girl (his way of referring to Jake Burton, in the early days, before they (sort of) mended ways).

9. Create the world’s leading Surf, Skate and Snow business enterprise.

10. Start a magazine.

11. Get snowboarding on MTV.

12. Date playboy bunny Kim Herrin.

13. Make a snowboard for riding waves.

14. Make a bike for riding waves.

15. Teach Kevin Staab, Hosoi, Alva, Jerry Lopez and all the badass North Shore lifeguards to snowboard.

There were hundred’s of other things on the list, these are a few I remember.

 

Alongside the list, Tom had a set of rules:

1. Never, ever, ever, cover-up any part of the Sims Triangle logo. This was Holy.

2. Never talk to Tony Hawk, Stacy Peralta or Stecyk about snowboarding, they might teach the Bones Brigade to ride and make Powell into the coolest snowboard company in the world, and erase Sims from snowboarding like they did in skate.

3. Make sure all the Bones Brigade guys have a free Sims board.

4. Never go snowboarding without a camera and loads of film.

5. Never shoot riders on anything other than Sims.

6. Never tell anyone at a ski company we are making money.

7. Never let Barfoot get bigger than Sims.

8. Never do anything to hurt Chuck Barfoot.

9. Never give up the back cover advertisement in any magazine.

10. Never let Palmer, Kidwell or Craig Kelly ride for anyone other than Sims.

11. Never buy coke for anyone on the team. Beer, Pot, Acid and Mushrooms are purchased at my own personal discretion and risk.

12. If you can’t be the best rider in the group, be the best-dressed.

13. Never forget to send every ski area owners kid a free snowboard.

14. Never directionally scrape wax off your board from tail to nose, always work from nose to tail.

15. Never remove your side fins when you have to ride on hard pack.

16. Never ride without style.

17. Always fold your high-back down in photos where you are holding your board next to a Burton guy (so you can show that Sims highbacks fold, and Burton’s don’t – a product difference now long erased).

18. Never wear a backpack. Fanny packs are cooler and show the Sims logo better.

19. Never wear ski clothes. Wear a wetsuit or something bright that you bought in Europe, preferably at the Jet Set store in downtown St Moritz.

20. Always ride gear that no one else can get, and ride in places no one else can go. Make sure you get a photo of you doing it.

21. Always shoot Terry Kidwell doing skate tricks, never show him cruising around or turning.

22. Always go to the Nastar slalom course when you get on at a ski area, make sure you post one of the fastest times on the course. Make sure you sideslip the course beforehand, to clean the ruts and prevent you from wrecking. If you wreck in the course, all of snowboarding’s image suffers.

23. Always remember that snowboarding is just skateboarding on snow.

24. Never go to work for Burton.

25. Never marry someone that isn’t blonde.

26. Don’t drink too much, never smoke and never take pills unless you absolutely need to.

27. Never talk about the list.

 

This list too, could go on for many pages, on all topics of life. None of it was ever written down or consciously accounted for, it was simply what we knew together and talked about each time we were together. It was the knowledge he dropped.

 

I worked and rode for/with Tom, in one form or the other, from the ages of 15-23. I was a blank slate of a kid, living on the edge of an Indian reservation with a small town half-pipe ramp in my buddy John’s backyard and a 2 chair ski resort 30 minutes from my front door. Skateboarding, Snowboarding and the few heroes who did it were everything to me. While under the tutelage of Tom I kept his rules for the most part. He, as the originator of the lists, kept the rules sacred – I never saw him violate them once. He looked sharp, rode fast and strong—always made sure we ‘got the shot’.

 

As for the ‘to-do’ list, some we got around to, some we didn’t – but everyday at work, or on the mountain, there would be lengthy one-way discussions, goal setting, flights of imagination, laughing, ego, hyperbole and bluster. That was Tom. He lived to create the list, and counted on me to note down and deliver on every idea we/he could think of.

 

The only listed topic he ever remained silent on was Playmate Kim Herrin, who I learned later; he had somehow scored a date with.

 

After a few years with Tom, I became an adult and gained a deeper appreciation for the manic, caring, inspiring, informative, insane and interesting person he was. As more layers of my youth wore off I also came to learn how different from Tom I was – and how important it was to do my own thing, in my own way.

 

He did funny and fantastic things when he could see I was growing up. He once paid me for 9 months “not to start a snowboard company” – and required me to do no real work for the money. On a different occasion he took me to a bar in Zurich, Switzerland and demanded that I get drunk with him. Halfway through the drinks he asked me to dare him to play James Brown “I Feel Good” on the Bar’s jukebox until we got kicked out. Nine song plays in a row we were thrown out into the street (I have vague memory of him taking a swing at the barkeep as we lay on the sidewalk laughing). He laughed for days over this event. We also later met up with Lopez, Derek and Tom’s close friend Terry – and took the whole legendary surf crew out riding. As one item on the list reduced, he immediately would replace it with a new item to do.

 

What I remember most of this time however was the coming of age experience and slow realization that Tom was capable of fear and anger, like anyone would be.

 

He was mad his business skills were beginning to fail him. Mad that Burton had taken control of the sport, the history and dialog around snowboarding (he rarely acknowledged the work and dedication of anyone at Burton). Mad that Craig Kelly’s contract (signed in haste at the bus station in Albany, New York) hadn’t held up when Burton came calling. Mad that all of his partners, in every facet of his business, always screwed him in the end. Mad at Vision Streetwear. Mad he couldn’t ride longer and live lighter. Mad at being mad at all of this. Yet somehow, he always kept it light. Whatever feeling he had always flashed, verbalized itself and was gone.

 

In the early 90’s, when I told Tom I was moving on to start Morrow Snowboards (not the shadow of the Morrow brand you see today) with Rob Morrow, Todd Richards and Noah Brandon, I expected mad. A true contrarian, he congratulated me and asked me to give him part of the company, if I could. When I started Bonfire, he again congratulated me, asked me for a Fireman Jacket and part of the company, if I could. I gave him a Jacket, and an option to buy the company 5 years later—not because I knew he really wanted it. I did it because I knew his pride would permit him to wear the coat or buy the company, and in some way I wanted to challenge him to move forward. I did it because I respected him, loved working with him and had grown up with his strange and fortunate influence in my life and work. Mainly, I did it because I was no longer a kid living by his impromptu mental list. We never worked together after that.

 

We moved through the later years of our relationship like many old friends do. Hooking up for the occasional run at industry events. Talking on the phone every now and then, I sent him a note after one of his Facebook rants—told him to mellow out and realize his legacy was sealed, strong and real. He didn’t need to say more about his work. We laughed about snowboard stories old and new—conducted a few secret meet-ups at trade shows, where he would master the ability to speak both deeply and cautiously about his business and personal challenges. We talked when Craig was killed in an avalanche. We talked about divorce, and then remarriage. Mostly in these talks, I listened, took notes and respectfully added to the mental list as the conversation went along—my way of acknowledging what a tremendous influence and friend Tom was to me. I assume that somewhere we each secretly knew too, there were parts of the list we had each never given up on.

 

My final memory of my life with Tom Sims is also my first memory of meeting Tom Sims. I called him one day when I was 14 years old, and asked him to tell me why his snowboards were so expensive. He ran me through all the technology; Rocker base, Solid Maple Plies, Steel Fins, Channeled tail, 3 inch Velcro ankle closures on the binding heel cup, 2 inch on the toe, “Same material Tracker Trucks builds their truck lappers out of, so you know my bindings are beefy”. I was sold, but explained to him I was currently riding on free Burton gear that Jake had supplied me with a season or two earlier. Tom said he would change that, and followed through a few weeks with a personal visit to my house some 600 miles drive from his home. I’m convinced he drove all that way after I told him Jake had recently visited and rode with my friends and me.

 

The contrast of their visits and the impressions remaining are indelible in my mind. When Jake arrived, he was in a road-grit covered mini-truck with a cheap camper slapped on top. He slept in the back while traveling. As a west-coast born and bred kid, my initial impression at 15 years old was that he was a Hippy hold-over from Vermont. I thought he was cool, and very well educated. Everything he had was Navy blue.

 

A year or so later, Tom Sims arrived, in a brand new gold BMW with wide, custom wheels, spoiler on the back and a gorgeous blond girlfriend in the passenger seat. Both Tom and his girl smelled like coconuts and the ocean breeze, rolling up to Flagstaff, Arizona. I breathe it all in. Tom’s car was filled with boards, drills, cassette tapes, camera gear, duct tape rolls, boot liners and everything else he could fit in the backseat. It was total chaos and I was immediately attracted. We met at his hotel, the nicest hotel in town, where his girlfriend pranced shyly around in a bikini bottom and sweatshirt (fresh out of the pool I presumed) while he preached the gospel of Sims and ran me through all his gear, each one of his boards, experiments and views on riding. I remember sliding a case of duct tape aside to view a nose shape from what he called ‘The proper distance to see the whole shape’. He made me move boxes, dig for screws and hold things while he drilled innumerable holes in decks, searching for the perfect stance. I was dizzy with the feint smell of wax, waves, wetsuits, women and willful indulgence. The entire conversation was passionate, quick, opinionated, filthy dirty and filled with eye contact and energy like no other adult had ever spoken to me. I was a child who had inadvertently stepped on the burning bush of snowboarding, and I liked the burn.

 

At the end of it all I thought, “Go! Go to snowboarding with everything you have in your heart…and I did”.

 

By virtue of these single and separate visits by Jake and Tom, I have come to believe I had a front row seat to the invisible ‘Matrix-like’ consumer and corporate context of snowboarding today, a context (I will add) that most never know exists—even as they work tradeshows and industry ladders. Tom Sims created the ‘Who’ a snowboarder was. And on the other side, Jake Burton created ‘what snowboarding will become’ and ‘how we will do it’. Both of their efforts, alongside many of us from the second wave, grew a sport.

 

This dynamic lives on today. When you get a board online, or at a retailer, then go to a resort and buy a lift ticket with no hassle or problems, thank Jake Burton. When you see a teaser of Jed Anderson sliding a massive handrail with bloody board graphics that feature his middle finger and a ‘Cheese Dick’s’ sticker, thank Tom Sims. When you see Danny and Dingo, thank Tom Sims. When you see the Sex Pistols, Black Flag and Minor Threat on your riding play list, thank Tom Sims. When you see riders with the freedom to design their own board graphics and image, thank Tom Sims. This is the consumer context, the rider archetypes set into place before an industry or business existed; one archetypal rider which is informed by nature and instinct—loose, fast, fun and untamable in all forms. The second archetype, an anti-form of the first; purposeful, intentional with a personal architecture whose only outcome is successful execution of the plan; Tom and Jake. Terry and Kelly. Palmer and Terje. Danny and Shawn. The archetype, by the way, knows no gender boundaries, Tina Basich and Shannon Dunn, Laura Hadar and Kelly Clark. It spins on ad-infinitum and snowboarding is always more interesting when it does so. It may also be the reason that Hybrid versions of snowboarding never hold the same imaging power as the pure archetype which is invested in the DNA of the sport by Tom and Jake – boardercross anyone? Moguls? Slalom and hard boots? We are children of a sport with an invisible purity seething out of every seam. Black. White. Cane, Abel, Goofy, Regular.

 

While the Sims brand has primarily failed in the core market today, in the 80’s they exposed the Achilles of Burton that brands like Bonfire, Capita, Airblaster, Ride, Rome, Lib, Union have all exploited over the last 20 years to define a point of difference in the business. As for Burton, for the last 20 years they have mastered indoctrination over incubation, leaving the latter to the ‘cool companies’ to serve up for their swooping while they use their expertise and passion to bring it to market. Neither part of this dynamic is wrong, or better or worse than the other. The point is that Tom Sims saw this structure, and knew these archetypes would drive the sport and everything around it, well before anyone in the second or third waves of snowboarding would ever puzzle this out. If there were a network of X’s and O’s behind the curtain of what was developing, Sims was Neo – and saw the horror, hope and hype of all of it.

 

For this reason I will never believe Tom Sims invented snowboarding, I will always believe that he invented the Snowboarder.

 

Tom Sims was a true Pioneer.

 

I have been called a snowboard Pioneer too, for many years now. Have even referred to myself as such, on speaking occasions, press releases, articles and imagery. It always makes me uncomfortable, living under a label. It is fundamentally against what Tom taught me. I have also seen many other people in the industry under the banner of ‘Snowboard Pioneer’, claiming a particular date they started a brand or began riding. Today, on Tom’s passing, I posit this is all bullshit. I’m no Pioneer. No other leader of any other snowboard company around today is a Pioneer, because we should honor the people who achieve this standard by defining Pioneer in precisely the meaning it was given in the days of the old west.

 

A Pioneer is someone who rides in rough off the plains and out of the wilderness; uninvited, dirty, disgusted and dying to get cleaned up—thirsty for the affections of anyone who will sit down and listen to the improbable tale of how that Pioneer came to be in front of them on that particular day. A Pioneer is someone who comes in hot – defies convention and corporate models. A Pioneer is to be approached with trepidation and some distance, until we hear them speak the will of their intent. A Pioneer is disruptive, disappears and moves on when you need them the most; they will not be lassoed into a tradeshow meeting, contract or business plan. A Pioneer will not settle in and mend the fences or build neighborly relationships with other Pioneers; because they’re dying to get outside and get to the shit they ‘gotta get done’ before they get to the next town, the next venture, the next idea on the list.

 

This is a Pioneer. Tom Sims was a Pioneer.

 

The rest of us ‘so called’ Pioneers?

 

We are like the land developers in the days just after the first slimy, glittering rock of gold was panned out of the murky dirt by that poor soul of a Pioneer who searched so hard and deep for something shiny to prove his worth. We are the ones with clean hands, tradeshow teeth and technology, who have happened upon that Pioneers’ clawed out hole in the river. We are the second wave, who put in resorts, retailers, magazines, websites, teams, terrain parks, teasers, podiums and profit.

 

We are too clean and too calculated to be true Pioneers.

 

As we of the second, and many other waves of snowboarding to occur since, look down at that unnamed shiny thing in the dusty desert that was the world before snowboarding, I say we all pause today and put a name to that first Pioneer, that first burst of energy that made us think, “There might be something to do here, something to grow here”.

 

The name of that Pioneer is Tom Sims.

 

I can see Tom Sims standing in the middle of that open area of the afterlife now. Feet pressed into the ground, so at to leave a mark for us in the twilight of life. His neck and body are bent down, looking into a small trickle of water, hardly enough water to require more than one step to pass over. He reaches into his pocket to grab an old piece of paper and a pen. He scribbles a note of what will become the new list, before looking up into the blown out hot sun (shoot 500@5.6 and close down two-stop, shoot Fujichrome 50 for better blue skies; he would say in analyzing the filmed image of these words). He places the paper back in his pocket and crosses the stream alone.

 

Thank you Tom for our time together. I feel good, like I knew that I would—because I have known you these many years. Put another Swiss Franc in the Jukebox and rest in peace my dear friend.

 

BRAD STEWARD

MARCO SEITNER 2ND PLACE @ BIG MOUNTAIN OPEN IN HOCHFÜGEN, AT

Flow Team Rider Marco Seitner

Marco Seitner makes 2nd place at the Big Mountain Open in Hochfügen. So he has qualification for 4**** FWQ Contest in Hochfügen (4. – 8.02.2012).

The weather gods were in good mood and let the sun shine during the snowboard competition. The face was well selected and they had a 25cm of fresh powder!

Next weekend Marco will start in St. Moritz (2**Stars), on Thursday at the 4**** FWQ in Hochfügen, and on Saturday at Engadinsnow! Good Luck, Marco!!!